The Railway Man and other things with Colin Firth

Dear Colin,

I’ve missed chatting. It’s been a year. A whole year. I do enjoy a good conversation with you. Which let’s face it, generally pops up in my head, where I imagine you’re listening whilst nodding politely. Probably not that politely, well, politely enough. You’re just that sort of person aren’t you?

Quite a lot’s happened hasn’t it? well, maybe not a lot has happened. Although I feel like a year is quite eventful. When a year passes by, it’s nice to catch up over a cup of tea. I’m having one, you’re probably doing something very important like filming or reading a new script or sewing, which is quite therapeutic. I don’t sew, so I’m not sure I would find it therapeutic. Although if I took to sewing as a form of therapy, I would have more nicks and cuts, some poorly constructed stitches and very bad knots, I would need to find another form of therapy to soothe my sewing woes.

If you are reading, do you have a ritual? do you read in the garden? in your study? do you play classical music? do you um, wear white? no this is not another reference to ” that white shirt”, I just wondered if you liked white? maybe you prefer blue.

I just saw The Railway Man and I am quite in awe. I always knew you were brilliant. Aside from that lovely white shirt and the role that “shall not be named,” which embarrasses you to the point where you might like to disassociate yourself from it, I don’t know why because that white shirt is really quite delightful, um dry or wet. I’ve seen you in a number of white shirts. On the red carpet, in the movies, in photos.

So back to the film we go. I had read bits and pieces about Eric Lomax but  knew nothing about his character, his wounds or his tremendous resilience.

photo courtesy: www.athenatv.com

 

 Photo Courtesy:www.dailyrecord.co.uk

www.telegraph.co.uk railway-man-irvine_2770769b (1)

 

Until…

I watched you interpret his life into film. Your eyes, your face, spoke volumes about his suffering. I don’t know how you do it. Well, I do know. Not that I know you. But I understand you have to be fairly exceptional at your craft to translate that depth of emotion where beneath the quiet, simmered quite a fire, an anger, a hatred and compassion, all of which you encompassed in lovely layers as you dealt with his post war trauma. My favorite scene is the confrontation with his captor, the cage, the grief and anger. I always see you as the romantic lead. It’s who you are. Perhaps you’re not and I’m wrong. Oh please say I’m not. But, there is the other side of you. A capacity to be dark, silent and broken. Did you stay in character to be able to portray the man who suffered, hated, then forgave?

I thought Jeremy Irvine was wonderful as the young Eric Lomax. The entire film was about resilience and the determination to remain un-broken. Yet he was, in so many ways. I understood Patti’s role much better after I watched the film. I know why people complained about the chemistry between you and Nicole Kidman. I think there was chemistry. Not in a strong, passionate, madly in- love sort of way, but a deeper, more compassionate connection that extended beyond the trauma from which Lomax returned. I also thought Hiroyuki Sanada who played the older Takashi Nagase, was desperately haunting. He stayed with me long after the film was done.

Moving on to other important matters…

I’ve just watched ‘Death Comes to Pemberley.’ The P.D. James book I have not yet read.

You know, I consider you to be the one and only Darcy. Er, in all matters Darcy that is. Oh, I’m sorry, I did not mean to mentioned the name. Um, but I have to say, I quite liked Matthew Rhys playing Darcy. He wasn’t tall. But he brooded beautifully and his smile, well now, that was quite breathtaking. I wasn’t quite sure about Elizabeth. I liked her. I love Matthew Goode. I know you do too. I mean you did, in ‘A Single Man.’ He was wickedly handsome, daringly devilish and a well played Wickham. Are you a fan of ‘ A Good Wife?’  It is a must. Well, not exactly a must, I don’t want to tell you what to do or anything.  He plays the assistant DA on the show and he’s really quite good.

Speaking of Darcy. It was quite traumatic to lose you in that final installment of the Bridget Jones series. I never did write to you about it. What could I say? My deepest condolences. I’m frustrated you were killed off. Why did you choose to go off and die, being heroic and all? I thought Bridget and Mark lived forever in their little world, filled with one little Bridget and one little Mark. I swore I would not watch the film. I am now very pleased you are alive in the film. You do not die, you are not killed off, not even accidentally via head trauma. You’re not are you? I’m sad Hugh is out. He really was Daniel Cleaver.

Oh and I can’t wait to catch you in ‘Magic in the Moonlight.’ I heard you were hysterically funny and the role was just so sweet.

photo courtesy: www.dailytelegraph.co.uk

 

You have two very interesting films coming out. I can only hope at least one of these films will have a showing in our local cinema. I know I’ve complained before, but they never listen to me.

 

The Secret Service one is exciting. And then there is the psychological thriller ‘Before you go to Sleep.’ Here you are taking on two very different roles. An interesting dichotomy then; A spy on the one hand and a devoted husband with an agenda, to Nicole Kidman’s character. I love that you are married again, um, in the film I mean. I guess It suggests you are both quite comfortable with each other. I love it. It makes for a better film, each time. There’s the proof then, you are truly versatile.

It’s been lovely chatting. My inner monologue is now silenced having said what I wanted to say. Not for long though, I’m sure we’ll chat soon. By the way do you like taking naps? I do. I find them refreshing. I just thought I might ask.

This post is dedicated to Katie, who left us a little over a year ago. Who will, I’m sure, giggle and smile, as she reads this, nodding, reaching for a piece of chocolate. Agreeing that white shirts are important, as is Downton Abbey. I miss the giggles!

 

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12 thoughts on “The Railway Man and other things with Colin Firth

  1. I do so love your chats with Colin and discussing his white shirts, wet or dry. I giggled when you asked if he sewed, he does look the sewing type, perhaps he does to relax after hours on set? I reached the bottom of the post and you reminded me of our darling girl and her giggles and her love of Colin, and if I may I shall write a poem for her. Lovely to see you writing again sweetheart. Pity you and Colin both can’t have a nap together, how devine would that be ‘wink wink’ ..love you speak soon. xxoo

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    • Hello my lovely, thank you! I have missed chatting with Colin, so you see it all sort of came out because we haven’t chatted in so long. He does sew, in fact he likes to darn. He didn’t tell me, I wish he did. I just read it.
      I miss our girl. Every time I write about Colin or his white shirt or eat some chocolate or see photos of Downton Abbey, I miss her. I bet you will write the most beautiful words – I can’t wait.

      I love that you enjoy my chats with Mr. Firth. Isn’t he delightful.
      Did you have a good break?
      love you xxx

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    • Thank you Kim. He is just wonderful to watch in film. I would like to sit down with a cup of tea, at a little tea shop in England and just chat. Chat about film, about politics, about what he reads, everything. I think that’s what I love about him, that he seems so approachable and down to earth.

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  2. OH, I love this, MM! So beautifully written, with just the right touch or irony mixed with whimsy. White shirts, indeed! I haven’t seen the Railway Man but so want to, maybe while my daughter is home for the holidays. You’ll enjoy Magic in the Moonlight. It’s a confection, sweet but not a whole lot of depth. But seeing it for Colin is very worthwhile. I love your inner monologue, and I love taking naps, too!

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    • Oh I’m so glad you enjoyed my post Monica. The conversation was bubbling for a while and I had so much to tell Colin. The Railway man was superb. I have no idea why his movies do not show at our local cinema, probably because they don’t think of them as blockbuster worthy. He is so good with just his emotions – they convey everything. I have to watch Magic in the Moonligt. I’ve been meaning to ask you, did you see A Hundred Foot Journey? I absolutely loved it. I could talk about Colin and movies for hours, just like books and chocolate.. Oh and naps too.

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  3. Hello my dear! I have SO missed you.

    LOVE your talk with Colin, as Monica said, you set just the right tone! I hope we get to see Railroad Man here. Don’t know that we will. There are some limits I fear.

    I’m trying to get my butt back in the saddle. Have been busy teaching workshops, looking at self-hosting my blog and writing my memoir (yes, I’ve been doing that), but I will make an effort to get something new out this week, including photos of our new home.

    Sorry to have been absent of late, my dear!

    Hugs from Ecuador,
    Kathy

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    • Hi my dear Kathy,
      So happy you’re writing your memoir. You know I will read. Anytime. I wish I could be a part of those wonderful workshops you teach. I’ve only seen photos, but I love what you do.

      My chats with Colin are completely deluded aren’t they? I mean this man talks to me in my head – well he sort of does, because I have much to say to him and I have a constant inner monologue about books and writing. I’m so glad you enjoyed it, I adore writing letters, In writing these notes to him, I feel like I’m actually writing a real letter.

      Can’t wait for photos, I know there will be lots of color and I love your sense of color.
      Hugs
      xx

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  4. Like the words to Colin Firth..for me the best actor, man, father, son, husband…he’s that kind of person “totally”..full…i love him and yesss..he’s unique….he’s the only one….

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